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Common Treeshrew
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4


Fig 5

 

Order : SCANDENTIA
Family : Tupaiidae
Species : Tupaia glis

Head-Body Length : 17-24 cm
Tail Length : 17-24 cm

Though they resemble squirrels, the teeth of treeshrews are arranged quite differently; they have in the past been considered as insectivores or even primitive primates. Now they are classified under their own order, Scandentia. The Common Treeshrew Tupaia glis inhabits primary and mature secondary forest, and is active in the day either on the forest floor, or amongst fallen branches where they feed on insects and fallen fruit.

The long, pointed snout immediately identifies this animal as a treeshrew, and this particular species has a distinctive pale band at the shoulder. The upperparts are brown, sometimes reddish-orange-brown or olive-brown, and the underparts generally buffy brown.

The Common Treeshrew ranges from southern Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore to Sumatra, Riau Islands, Java and Borneo.


Fig 1 : Typical dark brown specimen from lower montane forest (elevation = 1000 metres) at Fraser's Hill, Peninsular Malaysia.

Figs 2 to 4 : Three images of a sub-adult with orange-brown fur, from secondary scrub forest in Singapore. A huge yawn illustrates the size of the Common Treeshrew's gape in Fig 4.

Fig 5 : Specimen from Bintan Island, Riau Archipelago, Indonesia with reddish brown dorsal fur, and orange-yellow belly.


References : M1, M2