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Asiatic Lesser Yellow House Bat
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4

 

 

Order : CHIROPTERA
Family : Vespertilionidae
Species :
Scotophilus kuhlii

Forearm Length : up to 5.2 cm
Weight : up to 22 grams

In natural habitats the Asiatic Lesser Yellow Bat (or Yellow House Bat) roosts communally in hollow trees, but the species has adapted well to urbanisation and frequently roosts in large numbers in attics or abandoned buildings.

The face is dog-like with a blunt muzzle and large, pointed ears. The tail is long and enclosed in the membrane between the hind legs. The light brown to yellowish fur is extremely soft to the touch.

This adaptable species is wide-ranging from Pakistan and throughout the Indian Subcontinent to Burma, Thailand, Indochina, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia (Sumatra, Java, Bali, Borneo) to the Philippines.


Fig 1 : Searching for flying insects in a residential suburb, Singapore.

Fig 2 : Specimen from a lightly wooded area, Singapore.

Figs 3 and 4: Two specimens which emerged from a roost in the roof space of an old building in Changi, Singapore. Access to the roof space was through small gaps beneath the roof tiles.


References : M2, M3