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Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2021

 
 
     
   
   

 

   
   
 
Davison's Bridle Snake
   
   

Family : COLUBRIDAE
Species : Lycodon davisonii
Maximum Size : 92 cm

Davison's Bridle Snake occurs in a range of forest types, ranging from lowland areas to lower montane habitats of around 1000 metres elevation. It is also known from forest-edge and grassland settings.

This snake is mainly nocturnal (the example shown here, from Kaeng Krachan, Thailand, was found in its daytime hiding place, beneath a rotting log). It is mainly terrestrial but also partly arboreal in habits.

Its body is long and slender, and its elongated and depressed head is much wider than its body. Its patterning comprises a series of long, dark saddles, and intervening narrower white bars which expand and merge on the flanks. Its underside is immaculate white. There is a median dark stripe on top of the head. Its eyes are large, and bulging.

This species occurs in Thailand, Cambodia, Laos (?) Vietnam and Myanmar.


Figs 1 to 3 : Example from Kaeng Krachan district, Phetchaburi Province, Thailand, found in dry forest-edge habitat near an area of karst. This snake was found beneath a rotting log, where it was coiled into a ball: it was described as being quite docile.  This example has a slight bluish tinge. Photos thanks to Charles Currin.


References : H12

 

 

Fig 1
 
ゥ  Charles Currin
Fig 2
 
ゥ  Charles Currin
Fig 3
 
ゥ  Charles Currin