Vertebrate fauna of SE Asia
  

 

Home  
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia fauna ...  
   
Primates
 Carnivorans
 Large Mammals
 Small Mammals
 Mammal calls
 Bats
覧覧
Birds
覧覧
 Snakes
 Lizards & Crocodilians
 Turtles
覧覧
 Amphibians
 Tadpoles
 Frog calls
覧覧
Freshwater Fishes
 Marine & Brackish Fishes
覧覧
Species Lists
 





 


 
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia Vert Records (SEAVR) ...  
   
Philippines Records
  Indochina Records
  Indonesia & PNG Records
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
New Guinea herptiles ...  
Snakes   Lizards   Frogs  
覧覧覧覧覧  
   
  New pages ...
 
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 

Search this site ...

 
 


   

 
  覧覧覧覧覧  
  Email :


Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2020

 
 
     
   
   

 

   
   
 
Common Wolf Snake
   
   

Fig 1
 

Fig 2
 

Fig 4
 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Family : COLUBRIDAE
Species : Lycodon capucinus
Maximum Size : 76 cm

The Common Wolf Snake is a species of lowland forest. It is both terrestrial and arboreal in habits and may be found, for example, in the dark crevices of figs and other trees.

The species is also known as the House Snake, as it often inhabits old, landed properties such as colonial-era bungalows and buildings near forested areas. In such places, it is assumed it preys on house geckos.

Its body is relatively slender, and its flattened head is larger than its body. Its dorsal skin is brown, and this is patterned with yellowish markings which form a nominally 'reticulate' pattern. There is a pale yellow band around the neck, and the suprablabial lip scales are yellowish too. Its underside is pale.

Whilst quite a harmless snake, it is quite ready to bite when disturbed.

This species is known to occur in Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, southern China, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines and the Indonesia islands of Sumatra, Borneo, Java, Bali, Sulawesi and the Lesser Sundas.


Fig 1 : Example from lowland, secondary forest-edge in Singapore. It was found active at night amongst leaf litter, close to an old, colonial-era property.

Fig 2 : Curled defensively in the corner of a stair well.

Fig 3 : Example from an area of dry, secondary forest in Singapore.


References : H12


Links : Reptile Database