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Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2023

 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

   
   
 
Chequered Keelback
   
   

Family : NATRICIDAE
Species : Fowlea piscator
Maximum Size : 102 cm

This wide-ranging species mainly inhabits flooded lowlands including marshes, seasonal lakes, rice paddies and slow-flowing rivers. It feeds on fishes and frogs, and is both diurnal and nocturnal. 

Its body is robust, light brown in colour, and patterned with large, dark brown markings evenly distributed in rows along most of its body and tail. Its underside is pale, patterned with narrow, dark bars. The head bears two narrow, dark stripes extending below and behind the eye, and there is a dark band on the nape.

Reptile Database list a great number of countries and territories where this snake occurs; it ranges from Afghanistan and Pakistan in the west, through the Indian subcontinent to southern China, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and Peninsular Malaysia.


Figs 1 and 2 : A recently killed example from Siem Reap, Cambodia, near Tonle Sap lake. Its length was estimated as 90 cm.

Fig 3 : Underside of the same snake.

Fig 4 : The habitat adjacent to this roadkill is low scrub forest, close to areas which seasonally inundate when the water level of Tonle Sap rises during the rainy season. Either side of the road are deep, water-filled drainage ditches, about 2 metres wide.

All photos thanks to Derek Clark.


References : H12



 

Fig 1
 

ゥ  Derek Clark

Fig 2
 

ゥ  Derek Clark

Fig 3
  

ゥ  Derek Clark

Fig 4
 

ゥ  Derek Clark