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Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2020

 
 
     
   
   

 

   
   
 
Banded Linsang
   
   

Order : CARNIVORA
Family : Prionodontidae
Species : Prionodon linsang

Head-body length : up to 45 cm
Tail length : up to 42 cm
Weight : up to 800 grams

The family Prionodontidae comprises just two species of curiously-shaped animals known as linsang : the Spotted Linsang, occurs in parts of northern Southeast Asia, and the Banded Linsang, shown here, occurs in the south. Their geographical ranges do not overlap.

The Banded Linsang species appears to be mainly restricted to tall forest, either primary or secondary, but some individuals may explore adjacent cultivated habitats. It is fully nocturnal, and is both arboreal and terrestrial : by day it lies concealed in its nesting hole which may either be elevated or at ground level, beneath tree roots.

Its prey includes other vertebrates, such as reptiles, small mammals and nesting birds, and a range of invertebrates.

The species is unmistakable, with an extremely slender, lithe, elongated body, short legs, and a long, thick tail. Its fur is strikingly patterned : thick, irregular, dark stripes adorn its body, and 7 dark bands encircle its tail.

The Banded Linsang occurs in southern Burma, southern Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra (including the islands of Bangka and Belitung), Java and Borneo. There are no records from Singapore.


Fig 1 : A Spotted Linsang from Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia, pauses briefly as it runs along a fallen tree. Diurnal activity of this species is unusual: possibly this individual was disturbed from its daytime resting place, and it is looking backwards at the cause of the disturbance. Photo thanks to
MYCAT ゥ.

Fig 2 : Close-up of the cream and black neck markings.


References : M3, M5





 

Fig 1
  
ゥ  MYCAT

Fig 2