Vertebrate fauna of SE Asia
  

 

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Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2020

 
 
     
   
   

 

   
   
 
Maritime Gecko
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3


Fig 4
 

 

 

 

 


 

Family : GEKKONIDAE
Species : Lepidodactylus lugubris
Size (snout to vent) : 5 cm
Size (total length) : 10.5 cm

Also known as the Mourning Gecko, this species is mainly a coastal gecko inhabiting mangroves, back-beach and rocky shorelines. It may inadvertently be moved to areas away from the coast when coastal plants and trees are transplanted inland. 

It is typically grey-brown or greenish brown in colour, with a thin pale stripe behind the eye. Its dorsal surface and its tail is patterned with complex, wavy bars.

Juveniles are more boldly patterned with pale barring and mottling on the dorsal surface, and regular barring on top of the tail.

Most of its young are born by parthenogenesis (asexual reproduction), and the eggs are laid either in the soil, or adhered to the foliage of mangrove species, coconut trees, Pandanus and Banana.

The species is well distributed throughout much of Southeast Asia, including Burma, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, Borneo, Lombok, Sulawesi, Halmahera, Ambon, the Philippines and New Guinea.


Fig 1 : Example from the margin of Singapore's central forests.

Fig 2 : Example from the Singapore Botanic Gardens.

Fig 3 : Specimen from Pasir Ris mangrove, Singapore.

Fig 4 : Juvenile specimen found on an ornamental banana plant in a well-tended garden in the heart of Singapore.


References : H3