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Slashed-back Frog
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2
 

Family : RANIDAE
Species : Humerana miopus
Size (snout to vent) : at least 6 cm

Also known as the Three-striped Frog, or Khao Wang Frog, after the location in Thailand where it was first described, the Slashed-back Frog is a species of lowland forests where it frequents shallow pools and swampy areas. It has also been recorded in disturbed, riverine forest.

The shape of this frog is typically ranid (i.e. like a 'true frog'), and the body colour is highly variable, ranging from yellow or greenish-yellow to dark brown or greyish.

The distinguishing feature is the oblique scar-like lines on the dorsum of which there are typically three but, as in the example shown in Figure 2, there may be a more complex arrangement of numerous lines of varied length. These diagonal lines are apparent on late-stage tadpoles (Fig. 3).

The call of the adult frog is like a rapidly repeated dog's bark.

This species occurs in southern Thailand and Peninsular Malaysia. It has not been recorded from Singapore.


Fig 1 : Specimen with just three lines on its dorsum at Taman Negara, Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 2 : This specimen, from Sedili Besar, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia exhibits a more complex pattern of oblique, broken lines.

Fig 3 : Tadpole from Johor, Peninsular Malaysia. Note the presence of three oblique dark lines on top of the head. Photo thanks to Law Ingg Thong.

Figs 4 and 5 : Two examples from Gunung Arong, Johor, Peninsular Malaysia near lowland freshwater swamp forest: one is dark brown and the other greyish-brown.


References :

Leong Tzi Ming, 2005. Larval Systematics of the Peninsular Malaysian Ranidae (Amphibia: Anura). PhD thesis. Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore.




 

Fig 3
 
ゥ Law Ingg Thong

Fig 4
 

Fig 5