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Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2020

 
 
     
   
   

 

   
   
 
Kajang Slender Litter Frog
   
   

Family : MEGOPHRYIDAE
Species : Leptolalax kajangensis
Size (snout to vent) : 3.5 cm

The Kajang Slender Litter Frog occurs only on Tioman Island, which lies off the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia, in the South China Sea.

The species was first formally documented in 2004 (Grismer et al, 2004), the first specimens having been found near a cave entrance (formed by stream erosion and tropical weathering of granite) at the top of Gunung Kajang, the highest peak on the island, at an elevation of 1000 metres. Subsequently the species has been found at lower elevations - the example shown here was found at an elevation of 150 metres, along a forest trail.

This species of Leptolalax is dark in colour, with little distinct patterning on the upperside except for some faint mottling, and no patterning on the underside. The limbs are more pale, with faint dark crossbars. Its skin is relatively smooth to 'faintly pebbled'.

In common with other Leptolalax, its forelimbs are slender, and its hindlimbs are short and somewhat thicker. Its digits are slender and unwebbed. Its head is relatively large, and its eyes are large.

This frog breeds in fast-flowing streams, which sometimes issue from the mouths of small granite caves or fissures on the island. The tadpoles are large and unmarked, with a round head and upwardly pointing nostrils: these are dusky brown in colour, but unpigmented examples have also been found (Grismer et al, 2004).


Figs 1 to 3 : Specimen found amongst leaf litter along a forest trail at an elevation of 150 metres. Note the dark, unpatterned dorsum in Fig 3 which is typical of this species.

Fig 4 : Trail along which the specimen in Figs 1 to 3 was found.


Reference :

Grismer, L. L., Grismer, J. L. & Youmans, T. M. (2004). A new species of Leptolalax (Anura: Megophryidae) from Pulau Tioman, West Malaysia. Asiatic Herpetological Research, 10: 8-11.

 

Fig 1
  
ゥ  Serin Subaraj
Fig 2
  
ゥ  Serin Subaraj
Fig 3
  
ゥ  Serin Subaraj
Fig 4
  
ゥ  Serin Subaraj