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Field Frog
   
   

Fig 1
 


Fig 2
 

Fig 3


Fig 4
 

Fig 5
 

Fig 6
 

Fig 7
 

Fig 8

 

 

 

Family : DICROGLOSSIDAE
Species : Fejervarya limnocharis
Size (snout to vent) :
Females up to 6 cm, males up to 5 cm

Play call

The Field Frog, also known as 'Asian Grass Frog' or 'Rice Field Frog', is one of the smaller species of the genus Fejervarya: it typically measures up to 5 cm snout-vent length. It adapts well to disturbed habitats such as rice paddies, forest clearings, parks, gardens and oil palm plantations.

In the field it can be identified by its relatively pointed snout and flattened head (when compared to closely related species such as Fejervarya cancrivora). It has long toes on its hind legs and intermittent raised skin ridges on its dorsal surface.

It is typically brownish, with darker blotches, sometimes with a greenish or reddish suffusion or tinge. A pale vertebral stripe may sometimes be present: this may be cream in colour, or sometimes greenish. Its belly is white.

Within Southeast Asia this species occurs in Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, Sumatra, Java, Bali, Sumbawa Borneo, Sulawesi, the Philippines. The degree to which its range extends outside the Southeast Asia region is unclear.

It is likely that Fejervarya limnocharis represents a species complex, and that it includes a number of cryptic species from different geographic regions (e.g. Djong et al, 2007).


Fig 1 : Example from a roadside drain in secondary forest at Punggol, Singapore.

Fig 2 : Example from Taman Negara, Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia.

Fig 3 : Mating pair with thick cream-buff vertebral stripes. Seen at Danum Valley, Sabah, Borneo.

Figs 4 and 5 : Two small examples with green vertebral stripe and greenish suffusion, from Krabi, Southern Thailand.

Fig 6 : Example from southern Johor, Peninsular Malaysia, with a reddish suffusion.

Fig 7 : Example from Bali, Indonesia with inflated vocal sacs.

Fig 8 : The tadpole is mottled brown and black.


References : H3

Djong, T. H., Islam, M. M., Nishioka, M., Matsui, M., Ota, H., Kuramoto, M., ... & Sumida, M. (2007). Genetic relationships and reproductive-isolation mechanisms among the Fejervarya limnocharis complex from Indonesia (Java) and other Asian countries. Zoological Science, 24(4), 360-376.