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Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless credited to others.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2024

 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

   
   
 
Ashy Roundleaf Bat
   
   

Fig 1
   
Fig 2
 


Fig 3
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Order : CHIROPTERA
Family : Hipposideridae
Species : Hipposideros cineraceus

Forearm Length : up to 4.2 cm
Weight : up to 5.5 grams

This small roundleaf bat (also known as Least Leaf-nosed Bat) occurs widely in the Southeast Asia region, although bats designated as Hipposideros cineraceus may include at least two separate species.

These bats inhabit a variety of lowland forest types (including mangrove), and appear capable of adapting to a fair degree of habitat modification. They roost in caves, tree hollows and man-made structures including culverts. The highest elevation record is at 1480 metres.

The upper fur colour is described as "buffy-brown to greyish brown (or dark brown)" and its underparts "pale brown to buffy white". The Singapore population appears more orange-brown. The noseleaf is pink, and lacks lateral leaflets. The ears are relatively large, rounded and have a pointed tip.

This species occurs in Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Peninsular Malaysia,  Singapore, Sumatra and Borneo. Outside the Southeast Asia region it is known from parts of Pakistan, India, Nepal and China.

In Singapore, roosts of this species were first located by Mr. Noel Thomas on the island of Pulau Ubin in 2016-2017.


Fig 1 : The ears are rounded and have a pointed tip.

Fig 2 : Close-up of the simple noseleaf, which lacks lateral lappets.

Fig 3 : Regenerating lowland forest on Pulau Ubin, Singapore; the island supports a small population of Hipposideros cineraceus.  


References : M5, M6

Douangboubpha , B., Srinivasulu, B. & Srinivasulu, C. 2019. Hipposideros cineraceus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2019: e.T10119A2209310

Links :

Straits Times, Singapore:
'Bat man has a secret mission on Pulau Ubin'