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Indian Rock Python
   
   

Family : PYTHONIDAE
Species : Python molurus molurus
Maximum Size : 6 metres

A large snake, generally reaching up to 6 metres and in extreme cases up to 9 metres, the Indian Python P. m. molurus inhabits lowland forests. It is adept at both swimming and climbing trees. As with other pythons, it kills its prey - mainly small mammals- by constriction and suffocation.

The patterning comprises black-edged brown patches on a pale orange-brown to yellow-brown background. On top of the head is a distinctive lighter, forward-pointing, V-shaped marking. 

The Indian Rock Python occurs in eastern Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

A related subspecies, the Burmese Rock Python P. m. bivittatus, which is much darker in colour, occurs in Burma, South China, Thailand and Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia) with a separate distribution in parts of Indonesia (mainly Java).

There appears to be a zone of overlap between P. m. molurus and P. m. bivittatus covering northeast India and Bangladesh, and possibly extending into parts of western Burma (Chin and Rakhine states).


Fig 1 : A large Indian Rock Python emerges from a jungle in southern India.   Photo thanks to Dave Haylock.


References : H3
 

Fig 1
 
ゥ  Dave Haylock