Focussing on the vertebrate
 fauna of SE Asia
  

 

Home  
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia fauna ...  
   
Primates
Carnivorans
Other Large Mammals
Squirrels & Small Mammals
Bats
覧覧
Birds
覧覧
Snakes
Lizards & Crocodilians
Turtles
覧覧
Amphibians
FFrogs & other calls
覧覧
Fishes
覧覧
Species Lists
 







 
覧覧覧覧覧  
New! SE Asia Vertebrate Records  (SEAVR)  
覧覧覧覧覧  
New Guinea fauna ...  
   
Snakes
Lizards
Frogs
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
Articles & Publications
News Links
Singapore sightings
Feedback
Image policy
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 

Search this site ...

 
 


   

 
  覧覧覧覧覧  

Recently added ...
 
 
     
 
     
 
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
     
   
     
    Links :  
  Herpetological Soc. Singapore
  HabitatID  
  Primatewatching  
  Intl. Otter Survival Fund
  Orang Utan Appeal (UK)  
  Wallace Online  
    Citizen Action for Tigers  
    Nature Society (Singapore)  
  Traffic  
    Wild Singapore  
     
  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2017
   

 

   
   
 
Krai
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Order : Cypriniformes
Family : CYPRINIDAE
Species : Hypsibarbus sp.

These photos of Krai (Hypsibarbus sp.) were taken on the Tahan River (Sungei Tahan) at Taman Negara, Peninsular Malaysia.

For many years this stretch of the Tahan River seemed almost devoid of fish. During a visit in 1999 there was scarcely a single fish to be seen in these clean, unpolluted waters - the area had simply been overfished. In recent years, however, fishing has been banned in the area and it is protected as a fish sanctuary. The resurgence in the fish population seems nothing short of remarkable. A return trip in 2006 revealed a river full of fish once again.

These images graphically illustrate what appropriate management of fishing activities can achieve in areas once severely impacted by recreational fishing. In areas of Taman Negara still open to recreational fishing, the catch-and-release rationale is becoming better understood and more widespread amongst serious anglers.

The Krai specimens shown here are all a healthy 30 to 40 cm in length.
 

Figs 1 and 2 : Photos taken at Sungei Tahan, Taman Negara, Peninsular Malaysia.