Focussing on the vertebrate
 fauna of SE Asia
  

 

Home  
覧覧覧覧覧  
SE Asia fauna ...  
   
Primates
 Carnivorans
 Other Large Mammals
 Squirrels & Small Mammals
 Bats
覧覧
Birds
覧覧
 Snakes
 Lizards & Crocodilians
 Turtles
覧覧
 Amphibians
 Tadpoles
FFrogs & other calls
覧覧
Fishes
覧覧
Species Lists
 








 
覧覧覧覧覧  
  SE Asia Vertebrate Records  (SEAVR)  
覧覧覧覧覧  
New Guinea fauna ...  
   
Snakes
 Lizards
 Frogs
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 Articles & Publications
 News Links
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
 

Search this site ...

 
 


   

 
  覧覧覧覧覧  

Recently added ...
 
 
     
 
     
 
 
覧覧覧覧覧  
     
   
     
    Links :  
  HOSCAP Borneo  
  Context Institute
  Herpetological Soc. Singapore
  HabitatID  
  Primatewatching  
  Intl. Otter Survival Fund
  Orang Utan Appeal (UK)  
  Wallace Online  
    Citizen Action for Tigers  
    Nature Society (Singapore)  
  Traffic  
    Wild Singapore  
     
  Email :
 
     
  Text and photos by Nick Baker, unless otherwise credited.
Copyright ゥ Ecology Asia 2018
   

 

   
   
 
Blyth's (Glossy) Horseshoe Bat
   
   

Fig 1


Fig 2


Fig 3
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Order : CHIROPTERA
Family : Rhinolophidae
Species : Rhinolophus lepidus refulgens

Forearm Length : up to 4.1 cm

Blyth's Horseshoe Bat, or Glossy Horseshoe Bat, roosts in caves and houses near forest. In semi-urban areas it is known to have adapted to roost in man-made tunnels and drain culverts.

This is a small bat species with two colour phases - one reddish-brown, the other grey. In all forms the fur is quite glossy, and the underparts are pale.

The noseleaf is elaborate and comprises a typically shaped anterior horseshoe structure, a pointed bifurcated stella, and a high, pointed lancet.

Formerly Rhinolophus refulgens (Glossy Horseshoe Bat), was considered a separate species to Rhinolophus lepidus (Blyth's Horseshoe Bat), the latter ranging from the Indian Subcontinent and Burma to southern China and northern Thailand.  R. refulgens is now relegated to the subspecies R. lepidus refulgens, which has a complimentary geographical range from southern Thailand, Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore to Sumatra.
 

Fig 1 : Exiting a roost amongst granite boulders.

Fig 2 : A handsome reddish-brown specimen from Singapore.

Fig 3 : Greyish colour phase, Singapore.


References : M3