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Tioman Slender Toad
   
   
Fig 1
   
ゥ  Serin Subaraj
Fig 2
 
ゥ  Serin Subaraj
 

  
 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Family : BUFONIDAE
Species : Ansonia tiomanica
Size (snout to vent) :
Females 3.7 cm, males 3.1 cm

This small species of slender toad is endemic to Pulau Tioman (= Tioman Island), which lies in the South China Sea, off the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

It inhabits stream courses in primary forests up to elevations of around 1000 metres. Niches in such microhabitats include moss-covered boulders, small waterfalls, moist crevices and tangled vegetation.

Like other species of Ansonia, this species is slender in all senses of the word - its body is  elongate, its limbs are long and skinny, and its  digits are narrow and bony.

The skin colour of Ansonia tiomanica is dark brown to blackish, and it has small yellow spots, flecks or bars which are sparsely distributed on its dorsal surface and on the upper surface of its limbs. Its chest and underside are dark.

The species appears to be fully nocturnal.


Fig 1 : Typical example clinging to a moss-covered boulder.

Fig 2 : Typical micro-habitat of this species - a rocky gully with moss-covered boulders.


Links
:

IUCN Red List